2018 in Review 2019 Plan

2018 review….2019 plan…  

2019 is my time to apply everything I’ve learned in my life – personally, professionally, and what I’ve learned from others.

I’ve been in transition for years now – 2018 isn’t that much different than 2017 or 2016 professionally.  Understanding who I am, what I’m good at, what I I see, how that helps, why it matters…It’s been an amazing, sometimes painful, journey.  I value friends more, I value myself more, I value connections more, I value chance encounters more, I value people more.  I value different looks, different perspectives, lots of tolerance, and listening – as well as hearing. 

I’m willing to change my stubbornness for the common good. I’m willing to sit still and just be.  While I’ve been insistent on being the first to admit when I’m wrong, I’m now willing to be wrong.  I’m willing to trust my instincts which makes them stronger.  I’m willing to ask more questions.  I’m willing to hear the answers and modify my thoughts accordingly. 

I’m ready to fly – truly fly.  Help people.  Help increase our chance of success.  Help grow.  Help nudge.  Lead.

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Culture

I was told once by a consultant who specialized in culture, that when she looked around everything pointed to culture as the problem and the solution.  I didn’t believe her.  I thought everything was about being productive and working together because that’s what mattered to me.

When I looked at what, how, why I do (Thank you to Simon Sinek), I found a system: What = Same Road, Same Time, Same Direction. How = I manipulate the fabric of team dynamics.  Why = Create Accountability.

When I put it all that together and saw the system I create – you can’t have a system of positive accountability unless you have a positive culture that supports it. 

The reason I can turn projects around, even ones that are going up in flames, is that I change the micro culture of the project and create a system of accountability.

company-culture 2

Project Plan as a RoadMap

I’ve done a lot of different project plans and I’ve seen a lot more.  I’ve seen people put in a series of status meetings as tasks which only front loads the project level % complete.  I’ve seen Sponsors want individual steps for each repeatable task put in the plan because they feared we would forget them.  I’ve done 5000-line project plans because there was that much to do.  I’ve done little 40-line ones that are very high level and just keep us on track.

All very purposeful and useful and very like a bean counter.

I wish MS project/SmartSheets/etc was more fluid and allowed for us to see past the tasks and look at the project as a river system with lots of small trickles and streams.  All leading into a large river that supported the environment and provided even more than what we originally needed.  Instead, I find projects get blocked and misguided due to not taking the time to do business requirements and not thinking through the design and not taking the time we need to be successful.  Of course, there are constraints of time, resources, and scope but we take short cuts and remove scope due to our misunderstandings and assumptions, so we produce small rivers that don’t support even our basic needs. 

What if we did the right thing from the beginning?  Is that so hard?

big river

Expectations

Expectations are TOUGH.  You need some of them but not too many of them and they need to be just above where you are, so you strive to be more but not too high and they need to be realistic, so you feel motivated.  How in the world can you make that work?  Especially as a matrixed project manager who doesn’t know these folks very well.

Expectations are CRITICAL. This is what gives your team the belief that they can do it.  But, can also demotivate them if it feels out of reach or not presented with appropriate belief.

How do you find that balance? You listen.Expectations

What if it mattered?

 mead quote

What if? What if your team became ‘thoughtful, committed citizens’ to your vision? What if your team felt so strongly about their work – with you as their motivator – that they enjoyed coming to work? What if they found the ability to recover from the inevitable pitfalls to truly succeed – success being feeling happy with their work life?

We find happiness in our life (work and professional) when it matters to us.  We succeed because we found something that matters to us.  We change the world a little step at a time when it matters to us.

Matter in your own life.  Become ‘thoughtful, committed citizens’ to your own world and the big world (even your office) will get a little bit better – or maybe even a whole lot better.

Karenwiley@appliedteamdynamics.com

Making the impossible feasible, then successful